Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Make Points Not Ticks Consistently With Sceeto Emini Trade Setups

If you trade the S&P 500 Emini Futures, or trade the Nasdaq, Dow Jones, Rusell mini futures, or if you trade Forex and Crude Oil you need to check out www.sceeto.com for one of the worlds most advanced indicators. A no obligation Free Trial is availible.www.sceeto.com
Make Points Not Ticks Consistently With Sceeto Emini Trading Setups on 22nd feb 2013. using sceeto http://sceeto.com/user/register and Follow The Bots http://www.followthebots.com here is another of our training videos showing you very consistent setups for trading the Emini futures. Our setups are well planned in advance and using sceeto to monitor the order flow and hft trading bot activity you can have a lot of confidence in entering a trade. Please take our trial and check it out as well as our other training videos here on this channell. Supercharge your trading .

text courtesy of Wikipedia Creative Commons Licence

E-Mini S&P, often abbreviated to "E-mini" (despite the existence of many other E-mini contracts) and designated by the commodity ticker symbol ES, is a stock market index futures contract traded on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange's Globex electronic trading platform. The notional value of one contract is 50 times the value of the S&P 500 stock index.

It was introduced by the CME on September 9, 1997, after the value of the existing S&P contract (then valued at $500 times the index, or over $500,000 at the time) became too large for many small traders. The E-Mini quickly became the most popular equity index futures contract in the world. The original ("big") S&P contract was subsequently split 2:1, bringing it to $250 times the index. Hedge funds often prefer trading the E-Mini over the big S&P since the latter still uses the open outcry pit trading method, with its inherent delays, versus the all-electronic Globex system. The current average daily implied volume for the E-mini is over $100 billion, far exceeding the combined traded dollar volume of the underlying 500 stocks.[1][2][3]

Following the success of this product, the exchange introduced the E-mini NASDAQ-100 contract, at one fifth of the original NASDAQ-100 index based contract, and many other "mini" products geared primarily towards small speculators, as opposed to large hedgers.

In June 2005 the exchange introduced a yet smaller product based on the S&P, with the underlying asset being 100 shares of the highly-popular SPDR exchange-traded fund. However, due to the different regulatory requirements, the performance bond (or "margin") required for one such contract is almost as high as that for the five times larger E-Mini contract. The product never became popular, with volumes rarely exceeding 10 contracts a day.

The E-Mini contract trades 23 hours a day from 5:00pm -- 4:15pm the next day (excluding the 3:15pm -- 3:30pm maintenance shutdown), five days a week, on the March quarterly expiration cycle.

According to US government investigations the sale of 75,000 E-mini contracts by a single trader was the trigger to cause the 2010 Flash Crash.[4][5][6] This claim was later refuted by the Chicago Mercantile Exchange.[7][8]

Algorithmic trading, also called automated trading, black-box trading, or algo trading, is the use of electronic platforms for entering trading orders with an algorithm which executes pre-programmed trading instructions whose variables may include timing, price, or quantity of the order, or in many cases initiating the order without human intervention.

Algorithmic trading is widely used by investment banks, pension funds, mutual funds, and other buy-side (investor-driven) institutional traders, to divide large trades into several smaller trades to manage market impact and risk.[1][2] Sell side traders, such as market makers and some hedge funds, provide liquidity to the market, generating and executing orders automatically.

A special class of algorithmic trading is "high-frequency trading" (HFT). Many types of algorithmic or automated trading activities can be described as HFT. As a result, in February 2012, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) formed a special working group that included academics and industry experts to advise the CFTC on how best to define HFT.[